self and not the result. LR: Has there been any adjustment working with a different goalie coach? Has he changed things? BERNIER

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Got a question on rule clarification, comments on rule enforcements or some memorable NHL stories? Kerry wants to answer your emails at cmonref@tsn. Nike Air Max Tn .ca! Hi Kerry, I was watching the Senators-Flyers game and in the third period, the referees waved off a goal scored by Kyle Turris that clearly had crossed the goal line entirely after a lengthy review. Steve Mason slid out of his net to challenge Bobby Ryan, who passed the puck up to Turris in front of the net. Nicklas Grossmann appeared to block it with his skate to save the goal, but replays clearly showed that Grossmanns skate was completely in the net and the puck hit the back of his skate. The ref waived it off right away on the play but reviewed it after the play was done. The overhead view was blocked by Grossmann, but two other angles showed the puck was fully in the net and hit the back of Grossmanns skate that was also fully in the net. After the review the goal was waved off without an explanation. The game was tied 2-2 at the time of the non-goal and the Flyers scored 2 goals shortly after that and Ottawa ended up losing. My question is how can the referee waive off the goal when there was clear, conclusive evidence that the puck had crossed the line? Usually the referee gives an explanation when they review a goal, but this referee did not do that. I know when it comes to reviewing goals they get it right most of the time but this one they obviously got wrong. I just cant understand how they can make that call when the replays tell a different story. Could you clarify why they might have made the call? Thanks! Haleigh Japp --- Hey Kerry! No doubt you will receive several emails from many upset Sens fans regarding Kyle Turris "goal" in Philadelphia. I understand that the NHL has certain perimeters and that it was ruled "inconclusive", but, I think anybody would agree that that puck was in the goal. Obviously, I dont blame the ref for not being able to tell on the ice because that would have been a tough call to make, but seriously, how can the NHL get this right next time? Cheers, Justin NHL EMAIL: At 9:27 of the third period in the Senators/Flyers game, the Situation Room initiated a video review to further examine a play at the Philadelphia net. Video review was inconclusive in determining whether Kyle Turris shot completely crossed the goal line therefore the referees call on the ice stands - no goal Ottawa. Haleigh and Justin, While it "appears" that Kyle Turris shot "quite possibly" crossed the goal line based on the heel position of Nicklas Grossmanns skate, various angles of video do not provide the necessary conclusive evidence to overturn referee Paul Devorskis initial call on the play and allow a goal. While it is more probable than not that the puck crossed the goal line, the fuzzy depth perception that we gain once the puck deflected off Grossmanns left skate and went airborne provides a lack of conclusive evidence that is required to allow a goal through video review. The men in the NHLs Situation Room cannot make their decision based on any "logical assumptions" but must clearly see the puck enter the net. Even with various camera angles that are available, that process is made much more difficult once the puck leaves the ice surface and takes flight. The overhead camera shot was obstructed by the huge body of Nicklas Grossmann. Referee Devorskis sightline gained from behind the net was obstructed by the snowshoe-sized skate worn by Grossmann. The steeper angle provided by the front camera shot did not allow for conclusive evidence that the puck completely crossed the goal line once it flipped through the air. Grossmanns skate was angled back from tight to the post inside the goal line but moving as the puck deflected off his left skate. At that point, with the puck in the air, the overhead camera would be the only one that could provide evidence if the puck completely crossed the line. Some small element of doubt was created with this angle as the puck flipped in the air. Therefore the ruling had to be "inconclusive." In the absence of a clear video angle to determine the legitimacy of a goal on this play, there is a better alternative I might suggest. That is the sightline gained by the referee! Too often, I see referees attempting to judge a play with an obstructed view from below the goal line and especially behind the net. Unless a ref has X-ray eyes, from a position behind the net the goal frame, netting and the back of the goalie and skaters most often provide an obstructed view of the puck. When a player follows a shot at the net, he is coached to never skate past the goal line in order to play a potential rebound. In most situations, the same is true for a referee. In scrambles around the crease, the best sightline is gained from a position close to the goal, a step ahead of the line and looking into the net. From this location, even if the puck flips in the air, a referee has a much better opportunity to determine if the puck completely crossed the goal line. In this case, if the referee was looking into the net from just in front of the goal line, a different decision at ice level could have quite possibly been rendered. Had that been the case, any inconclusive review would have allowed a potential goal by Kyle Turris to stand?. Puma Basket Heart Wit . The deals were announced on Friday. Beckham will receive $4.175 million in base salary, while De Aza will receive $4.25 million. Beckham hit .267 with five home runs and 24 RBIs over 103 games last season, his fifth with the White Sox. Nike Air Max Tn Zwart . Various media outlets, including the Detroit Free Press, indicate a deal is close, while USA Today cited an unidentified person directly involved with the negotiations as saying the pact is for two years. http://www.onlinesneakerstorenl.nl/puma-basket-heart-patent.html .cas NHL Play of the Year showdown continues today with a man whos spent most of his career on highlight reels and a goalie actually "reaching back" for a save.TORONTO – Among the many stars, fleeting paparazzi and widespread shimmer of the Hollywood scene was sheer anonymity for the former backup goaltender of the Los Angeles Kings. Jonathan Bernier was but a blip on the glitzy California radar, but now in his first season in Toronto, he finds himself squarely in the spotlight. One half of the Leafs standout goaltending tandem, the 25-year-old has raced out to a quick start with the new opportunity, posting a .933 save percentage in his first 10 games. Born 30 minutes outside of Montreal in nearby Laval, Quebec, Bernier knows a thing or two about the intensity and pressures of a furious hockey market. Speaking to the Leaf Report on Thursday afternoon, he detailed his adjustment to life in the spotlight, life with a new team and goalie coach, and starting on a regular basis. What follows is an edited transcript of that conversation. LR: Im wondering what the difference is off the ice in coming to Toronto. Youre coming from a place in L.A. where its not the same intensity as here. Whats that been like, that process of coming to a hockey market per se? BERNIER: Its definitely an adjustment because in L.A., youd be out on the street and no one knows who you are. Even the greatest players, [Anze] Kopitar and Dustin Brown, theyll maybe get recognized once in a while. [But] here, you have a good game, next day you go out for breakfast or whatever and everyones happy for you. People are very respectful and thats the one thing I found right away is theyll come and say congrats or good game, but theyre very respectful and thats a great thing. LR: Did the first time it happened catch you off guard? BERNIER: I heard about it [before I came here]; guys told me about it. And obviously coming from a big city like Montreal as well, I knew how [their players] deal with the fans outside the rink so I was expecting that a little bit. LR: So just going back to L.A., you could go out to dinner and walk down the street and just nothing? BERNIER: Nothing. Id say after the Cup [in 2012], people kind of knew who we were [in the area] where we lived, but if wed go downtown or Hollywood, theres no chance. LR: So whats the strangest thing that someones said to you here? BERNIER: I havent got any good stories yet (laughs). LR: Do you like the change? BERNIER: Yeah, its a good change. I think it keeps you focused on hockey. You dont want to have a bad game because then the next day, youre going to hear about it (laughs). LR: You understand the market in Montreal, how do you think the two are similar? BERNIER: I think theyre very similar. The [cities are] both supporting the team. I think for me though speaking French and being in Montreal, I think itd be a lot harder just because you have two sessions of media pretty much (laughs). LR: When a player comes to this kind of market, what are the adjustments required just to be ready for that kind of stuff? BERNIER: I found there is pressure, but pressure, you put that on yourself. If you dont really focus on whats going on on TV and radio and internet, I dont find [that it adds pressure]. Maybe [thats] because right now were having success – we have a good record – but maybe if it would be the opposite, maybe Id say a differentt thing. Nike Air Max 90 Dames Sale. But so far I havent found that its that hard. Like I said, you just put pressure on yourself so its all about how much pressure you want to put on you. LR: Well, I would imagine it doesnt really change your focus. Your focus would have to be the same regardless. BERNIER: Yeah, exactly. I think even in L.A., among the guys, we were putting that much pressure on ourselves and the GM and coaches. Its kind of the same way here. We try to stay away from the media pressure and just focus on ourselves and our team and just make sure were ready every game. LR: You told me last week about the focus thats required mentally playing more often. Has it helped? Does it help you be a better goalie when you know youre playing more often? BERNIER: You mean from the pressure? LR: No, just in terms of your preparation in being ready to play. I would imagine in some situations in L.A., its difficult when you go a couple weeks and you havent played and youve got to get back in there and play well. Has it been like you thought it would be? BERNIER: I think its easier mentally just because the reason is youre happy and you dont get off into negative thoughts and things like that. So I think if you stay positive and just keep working hard, then youre having fun. I think as a hockey player or any sport, if youre having fun, usually youll have success. I think that was the thing in L.A.; sometimes I was getting frustrated in not playing. But at the same time, here, its fun. We have a great group of guys, were winning right now and its a big snowball. LR: And I can imagine the worst thing is if you had an off-night and you dont get to start for a while its just got to burn you? BERNIER: Yeah. And thats something that I had to learn my first year is not to worry about the result of the game, more focusing on my game. Because then you start worrying if you dont win, then youre not going to play for another two, three weeks and you have to think about that loss. I think I got better [at that] as the years went along. That was something I was really focusing on was just focusing on myself and not the result. LR: Has there been any adjustment working with a different goalie coach? Has he changed things? BERNIER: No. Rick [St. Croix] is really good. Hell just try to give me some tools, but at the same time, its not something that hes going to say you have to do this. Hes just going to let me know hey if you want to do this in a game or in practice, work on that and if you feel comfortable do it. But the one thing I really like is I think he watched a lot of video and probably heard about my style and he adjusted to that. He knows when I feel comfortable with my depth and things like that. Obviously its still new, but were starting to get a good chemistry between him and I. LR: So is that your depth in the net? BERNIER: That was just an example. It can be how I played the puck, make quicker decisions or things like that. But I can tell that he watched video and saw when I was on my game what I was doing right. LR: And thats what James [Reimer] told me, I remember last year, that Ricks not the kind of guy whos going to say you have to do this, hes going to look at what you do and say we can do this. BERNIER: Exactly. Cheap NFL Jerseys Wholesale Jerseys Wholesale NFL Jerseys Jerseys From China Wholesale NFL Jerseys Cheap NFL Jerseys Cheap Jerseys ' ' '

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